Recipes for Chocolate Truffles – The New York Occasions

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Recipes for Chocolate Truffles - The New York Times

Slightly uneven little balls dusted with cocoa to simulate the bottom of a freshly dug mushroom – the black tuber melanosporum – define a chocolate truffle in its most basic form. Inside is a firm but velvety center, a confection called ganache. Truffles are never cheap, but before taking the credit card out, consider the homemade variety. They couldn't be easier to manufacture and don't require special equipment. Under supervision, an 8-year-old can sculpt and dive truffles for a nice afternoon activity.

In addition to the classic version with a cocoa coating, chocolate truffles are often wrapped in a chocolate shell, which is sometimes decorated with nuts, frosting, and even gold leaf. Their taste can also be varied depending on whether you opt for dark, milky, or white chocolate, adding ingredients like raspberry puree, nuts and coffee, or spirits like port, brandy, and even champagne. Size also plays a role. Chocolate truffles should be a bite, no more than an inch in diameter – three-quarters of an inch is ideal.

Time: 4 hours including chilling

Yield: approx. 40

6 ounces of high quality semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate, 70 percent cocoa

½ cup of heavy cream

3 tablespoons of ruby ​​port or grape juice

½ cup of unsweetened cocoa using the Dutch method

1. Cut the chocolate into small pieces, place in a small, heavy saucepan and add the cream. Stir occasionally over low heat until the chocolate has melted. Remove from heat, stir in port wine or juice; put in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate for about 2 hours until mixture is firm.

2. Spread a sheet of waxed paper or parchment paper on a baking sheet. Have a bowl of ice water ready. Use a spoon or spoon, or a melon baller, to scoop up mounds of mixture about 3/4 inch in diameter. Gently roll between your palms to form beautiful balls and place them on the paper. Occasionally moisten the spoon and your hands with ice water to keep the chocolate from sticking. Chill until firm, about 2 hours or overnight.

3. Spread the cocoa on a chilled plate. Take the truffles out of the refrigerator, roll them each in cocoa and place them back on the baking sheet. Cool to firm. Truffles can be frozen for up to a week.

Time: 6 hours including chilling

Yield: approx. 40

6 ounces of high quality semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate, 70 percent cocoa

½ cup of heavy cream

3 tablespoons of Prosecco

½ pound high quality white chocolate to coat

1. Break the dark chocolate into small pieces, transfer them to a small, heavy saucepan and add the cream. Stir occasionally over low heat until the chocolate has melted. Remove from heat, stir in the prosecco and place in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate for about 2 hours until mixture is firm.

2. Spread a sheet of waxed paper or parchment paper on a baking sheet. Have a bowl of ice water ready. Use a spoon or spoon, or a melon baller, to scoop up mounds about 3/4 of an inch in diameter. Roll lightly between your palms to make beautiful balls and place them on paper. Occasionally moisten the spoon and your hands with ice water to keep the chocolate from sticking. Chill until firm, about 2 hours or overnight.

3. Break white chocolate into pieces and melt on top in a double boiler or place in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave on 50 percent power for 1 minute, stirring every 15 seconds. Let the chocolate cool to about 90 degrees at room temperature and stir it from time to time. Drop chilled truffles one at a time into melted chocolate and quickly lift them out with a small fork or professional wire dip loop to allow excess water to drain off. Place on a baking sheet and store in the refrigerator for about 2 hours.

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